EES
 

MS and PhD Curricula

 

Core Courses

Each of the specialty areas in Environmental Engineering and Science requires a subset of the core courses listed here. For details, see the sections on the specialty areas below.

 

Specialty Areas

For details about each specialization area, click on its name, or simply scroll down to browse through all of the areas.

The sections below provide detailed information about each of the seven specialization areas in Environmental Engineering and Science.

*The Aquatic Biology/Ecology Specialty Area is not currently offered.

Students interested in pursuing sustainability-focussed degrees may also be interested in the cross-cutting programs of Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure Systems (SRIS), Energy-Water-Environment Sustainability (EWES), and Societal Risk Management (SRM).  Students are eligible to receive M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Environmental Engineering by meeting additional criteria (as described at the bottom of this page).

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Air Quality Engineering And Science

This area concentrates on the fundamental mechanisms that control the chemistry and physics of air quality and contaminant emissions. Consideration is given to gas and particle phases and their interactions in atmospheric, industrial, and laboratory systems. Students with strong engineering, chemistry, physics, and math backgrounds are suited for this specialty. Employment opportunities for graduates with MS degrees include those in industrial air quality control and process groups, environmental consulting firms, and governmental agencies. Ph.D. students can find employment in these areas as well as in research and academic institutions.

Required Courses

Note: Students entering this option without CEE 446 (or its equivalent) will be required to complete it during their graduate studies

Elective Courses

Aerosol and atmospheric science, air quality process engineering, and atmospheric chemistry are important facets of air quality studies. Thus example electives listed below are divided into these areas, with an additional fourth area of related engineering science courses. This breakdown is for convenience only. Students should select appropriate electives from any of these groups in accordance with research and career objectives and in consultation with their advisor. Students may also select courses not listed below in consultation with their advisors.

Note: Air Quality Engineering and Science students often find more flexibility in the job market when they have supplemented their studies with courses from other environmental options. Courses such as CEE 449CEE 437 and CEE 443 are therefore highly recommended.

  • Air Quality Process Engineering

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Aquatic Biology/Ecology*

This specialty area provides advanced study in assessing, monitoring, and managing aquatic ecosystems to students with backgrounds in biology, ecology, or the environmental sciences. Students should have completed course work in analytical and organic chemistry, calculus, and ecology. Students pursuing a Master’s of Environmental Science have the option of selecting a treatment process or management emphasis in advanced courses. Students pursuing a PhD select course work supporting their research from engineering or an interdepartmental concentration in environmental resources management. Graduates typically find employment in state or federal agencies or other governmental positions and are qualified for a variety of positions with consulting organizations.

*The Aquatic Biology/Ecology Specialty Area is not currently offered.

Required Courses

  • Required Core Courses (All Options):
  • Required Advanced Courses for Management Option
    • CEE 598 SE Biology of Stressed Ecosystems
    • and either CEE 534 Surface Water Quality Modeling
    • or CEE 535 Environmental Systems, II
  • Required Advanced Courses for Process Option
    • CEE 537 Water Quality Control Proc, I
    • CEE 538 Water Quality Control Proc, II

Typical Elective Courses

  • Electives in the Management Option
    • ENVS 431 Environmental Toxic Substances
    • GEOG 468 Biological Modeling
    • LA 550 Environmental Impact Assessment
    • NRES 429 Aquatic Ecosystem Conservation
    • VB 596 Interdisciplinary Tox Sem
  • Electives in the Process Option
    • CEE 440 Solid and Hazardous Waste
    • ENVS 431 Environmental Toxic Substances
    • or electives from the Microbiology Option of the Water Quality Microbiology Program.

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Environmental Chemistry

This program is designed to provide advanced study to students interested in the chemical mechanisms that govern important natural and engineered environmental processes. Emphasis is placed on establishing molecular-level mechanisms that control the environmental fate of organic and inorganic contaminants. This specialty is well suited for students that possess strong backgrounds in chemistry and engineering. Students elect either the option in atmospheric and air pollution chemistry or the option in water and interfacial chemistry. Career opportunities for graduates include teaching, research, and management of environmental chemistry issues in industry, consulting organizations, and government.

Required Courses

  • Required Core Courses for Atmospheric and Air Pollution Chemistry Option:
  • Required Core Courses for Water and Interfacial Chemistry Option: 
    • CEE 442 Env Eng Principles, Physical
    • CEE 443 Env Eng Principles, Chemical
    • CEE 444 Env Eng Principles, Biological
  • Required Advanced course for Water and Interfacial Chemistry Option:

Elective Courses: In consultation with their academic advisors, students choosing the atmospheric and air pollution chemistry option should select at least two 500-level courses to complete their programs. Students choosing the water and interfacial chemistry option should select at least one 500-level course besides CEE 598EC to complete their program. Some courses have prerequisites other than the above core courses. Examples of elective courses that can be taken for study in this emphasis area are as follows:

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Environmental Information Technology

The environmental information technology (EIT) area of specialization combines fundamental principles of environmental engineering with information technology principles such as computer programming, software design, numerical simulation, optimization, artificial intelligence, information and decision support systems, and visualization. The student may orient the program in a number of different directions, depending on interests, career goals, and academic background. Career opportunities at the M.S. and Ph.D. level include environmental software development and/or applications in consulting firms and industry. At the Ph.D. level, additional opportunities exist in academia, government, and industry research laboratories.

Required Courses

These courses provide fundamental background in the principles of environmental engineering, numerical methods, and computer programming and software development. While not required, students are strongly encouraged to take both CEE 442 and 444.

Elective Courses

In consultation with their advisors, students will select at least 8 credit hours of information technology courses from the "Courses in IT" list at http://cee.uiuc.edu/research/it/ITCourses.htm. Students should select appropriate electives in accordance with research and career objectives to meet the normal EES degree requirements, including at least 8 hours of 500-level CEE courses. Some CEE courses with environmental emphasis that are typically taken by students in this specialization are listed below.

Course Listings

For more detailed course descriptions, see the course listings elsewhere on this site or the University of Illinois course catalog.

  • Core Courses
  • Environmental Engineering Processes
  • Modeling of Environmental Engineering and Science Problems

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Environmental and Water Resource Systems Analysis

This specialty area focuses on several fundamental sciences associated with managing water resources and environmental systems and their integration into useful techniques for engineers and planners. Applications include, but are not limited to: reservoir design and operation, flood plain management, river basin management, environmental and water resources policy analysis, watershed restoration and management, remediation and monitoring design, planning for future municipal and industrial water supply needs, sustainability concerns (e.g., energy and water tradeoffs) and crafting total maximum daily load (TMDL, or 303(d) programs). The student in this specialty area acquires an understanding of topics such as hydraulics, hydrology, water quality modeling (both ground and surface water), optimization and decision support, statistics, and environmental and natural resources economics. These graduates are especially well-suited for work for government agencies, consulting engineering firms, and environmental advocacy organizations, as well as academic organizations.

A. Required Courses
Core courses
  • All students are required to take:
    • CEE 434:  Environmental Systems Analysis, I
    • CEE 442:  Env Eng Principles, Physical
  • Select two additional core courses (for a total of at least 4) among the following. Students must take at least one of the first three courses.
Advanced Course (at least one of the following courses required for PhD degrees and highly recommended for MS degrees):
B. Elective Courses: Courses shown are typical only - others may also be taken.
  • CEE 430: Ecological Quality Engineering
  • CEE 432: Stream Ecology
  • CEE 452: Hydraulic Analysis and Design
  • CEE 453: Urban Hydrology and Hydraulics
  • CEE 491:  Decision and Risk Analysis
  • CEE 437:  Water Quality Engineering
  • CEE 534: Surface Water Quality Modeling
  • CEE 550: Hydroclimatology
  • CEE 551:  Open-Channel Hydraulics
  • CEE 552: River Basin Management
  • CEE 555:  Mixing in Environmental Flows
  • CEE 557:  Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport
  • CEE 559: Sediment Transport
  • CEE 598 EH: Environmental Hydrodynamics
  • CEE 598 SGW:  Stochastic Analysis of Ground Water Flow and Transport
  • CEE 598 SH: Stochastic Hydrology
  • CEE 552: River Basin Management
  • CEE 498 SUE: Sustainable Urban Engineering
  • GE   531: Genetic Algorithm Methods
  • GE   530: Multiattribute Decision Making
  • IE 410:  Stochastic Processes & Applic
  • IE 411: Optimization of Large Systems
  • IE 510:  Applied Nonlinear Programming
  • IE 511:  Integer Programming
  • STAT 420: Methods of Applied Statistics
  • CS 412: Intro Data Mining
  • GEOG 476: Applied GIS to Environ Studies
  • ENVS 511:   Environmental Economics
  • ECON 516: Environmental Economics
  • ACE 510: Adv Natural Resource Economics
  • LAW 616:  Environmental Law and Policy, I
  • LAW 617:  Environmental Law and Policy, II
  • UP 405: Watershed Ecology and Planning
  • NRES 401:  Watershed Hydrology
  • NRES 403:  Watersheds and Water Quality
  • UP 405: Watershed Ecology and Planning

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Hazardous Waste And Subsurface Science

This program is designed to educate students about the source, regulation, transport, fate, effects, control, and remediation of hazardous or unwanted chemicals in the environment. The fundamentals of chemistry, physics (e.g., transport), microbiology, process and system design, and system management are emphasized. Graduate students may be able to participate in ongoing research as part of the program. MS graduates are prepared to work for consulting firms, industry, and governmental agencies or to continue study for the PhD degree.

Required Courses:

Required Advanced Courses: Students should select at least two 500-level elective courses consistent with career objectives and in consultation with an advisor. Some 500-level courses have 400-level prerequisites that students may need to take. Examples of courses that can be selected for study in a particular emphasis follow:

Elective Courses

The following list contains examples only. Courses not listed may also be selected in consultation with an advisor.

  • System Design and Management

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Water Quality Microbiology

This area concentrates on the fundamental chemical and microbiological mechanisms found in unit operations employed in water quality control and in natural systems, such as soil, groundwater, and surface water. Undergraduates with strong backgrounds in chemistry, mircobiology, and biochemistry are best suited for this specialty. Graduates typically find employment in research laboratories, industrial environmental control groups, consulting firms, and governmental regulatory agencies. Electives are chosen to strengthen the basic science area.

Required Courses:

  • Required Advanced Courses
    • CEE 537 Water Quality Control Proc, I
    • CEE 538 Water Quality Control Proc, II

Elective Courses:

Courses shown are typical only. Courses not listed may also be taken as electives.

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Water Quality Process Engineering

This specialty area concentrates on the fundamentals, design, and operation of biological, chemical, and physical unit processes for the treatment of water and wastewater. Applications of water and wastewater treatment come from the municipal, industrial, and hazardous waste sectors. Because of the emphasis on design and operations in this specialty, the student in this specialty area needs a background in hydraulics. These graduates are especially well suited to work for consulting engineering firms designing water quality control processes. Employment opportunities also are available in the operation of water treatment and wastewater treatment systems, in various governmental agencies, and in process research and development.

Required Courses

  • Required Advanced Courses

Elective Courses:

Courses shown are typical only. Other courses may also be taken as electives.

Watershed Science and Management

 

This specialty area focuses on integrated approaches to understanding and managing watersheds and river basins, considering water quality issues at large scales. This includes areas such as coupled physical, chemical, biological, and social processes that affect watersheds; best management practices for runoff (e.g., bioswales, buffer zones, permeable pavements) to improve water quality; total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) and integrated water engineering to manage the entire water cycle, including engineered infrastructure. The student in this specialty area acquires an understanding of topics such as hydraulics, hydrology, and water quality processes and modeling (ground and surface water and atmospheric interactions).
A. Required Courses
Core courses
  • All students are required to take:
  • Students must take one of the following two courses.
  • Students are highly recommended to take the following course
Advanced Course (required for PhD degrees and highly recommended for MS degrees):
B. Elective Courses: Courses shown are typical only - others may also be taken.
  • CEE 430:  Ecological Quality Engineering
  • CEE 432:  Stream Ecology
  • CEE 452:  Hydraulic Analysis and Design
  • CEE 453: Urban Hydrology and Hydraulics
  • CEE 437:  Water Quality Engineering
  • CEE 435:  Environmental Systems I
  • CEE 535:  Environmental Systems II
  • CEE 534:  Surface Water Quality Modeling
  • CEE 550:  Hydroclimatology
  • CEE 551:  Open-Channel Hydraulics
  • CEE 555: Mixing in Environmental Flows
  • CEE 557:  Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport
  • CEE 559:  Sediment Transport
  • CEE 598 EH:  Environmental Hydrodynamics
  • CEE 598 SGW:  Stochastic Analysis of Ground Water Flow and Transport
  • CEE 598 SH:  Stochastic Hydrology
  • CEE 498 SUE: Sustainable Urban Engineering
  • UP 405: Watershed Ecology and Planning
  • NRES 401:  Watershed Hydrology
  • NRES 403: Watersheds and Water Quality
  • ECON 516: Environmental Economics
  • ACE 510:  Adv Natural Resource Economics
  • LAW 616: Environmental Law and Policy, I
  • LAW 617: Environmental Law and Policy, II

 

Degree in Environmental Engineering from Cross-Disciplinary Programs

 
Masters Degree in Environmental Engineering
Either CEE 442 (Env Eng Principles, Physical) or CEE 451 (Environmental Fluid Mechanics). One of the following courses: CEE 443 (Env Eng Principles, Chemical), CEE 444 (Env Eng Principles, Biological), or CEE 447 (Atmospheric Chemistry). At least one of the following additional principles courses: CEE 443, CEE 444, CEE 434 (Environmental Systems I), CEE 440 (Fate Cleanup Environ Pollut), CEE 445 (Air Quality Modeling), CEE 446 (Air Quality Engineering), CEE 447 (Atmospheric Chemistry), CEE 450 (Surface Water Hydrology), CEE 453 (Urban Hydrology and Hydraulics), CEE 457 (Groundwater). At least one 500-level course selected from the EES or EHHE programs
 
PhD Degree in Environmental Engineering
Student must meet the requirements of the MS program outlined above or have previously received the MS degree in environmental engineering. Student will take the CEE interdisciplinary qualifying exam. The student must include at least one EES faculty member on the qualifying exam committee and the PhD final exam committee.

 

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